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dc.contributor.authorGloria, Alberta M.
dc.contributor.authorCastellanos, Jeanett
dc.contributor.authorScull, Nicholas
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-10T07:04:46Z
dc.date.available2016-05-10T07:04:46Z
dc.date.issued2009-07-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11675/1406
dc.description.abstractThis study examined 100 male Latino undergraduates' cultural self-esteem, perceived educational barriers, cultural fit, coping responses (CRs), and subsequent well-being within higher education. The most commonly reported CR for Latino males was to actively find out more about the situation and take a positive planned action. Assessing group mean differences, a class standing by generation interaction revealed that first-generation lower division and first-generation upper division students reported higher perceptions of barriers to staying in school than second-generation lower division and second-generation upper division students, respectively. Similarly, examining differences of coefficients, the strength of the relationship of perceptions of barriers to staying in school and psychological well-being was significantly stronger for the first-generation than second-generation male students Cultural congruity and emotion-focused coping were most predictive of psychological well-being; however, perception of barriers to staying in school was consistently evident in understanding male Latino undergraduates' educational experiences.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.relation.journalHispanic Journal of Behavioral sciencesen
dc.titlePsychological Coping and Well-Being of Male Latino Undergraduatesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.journal.issueV. 31 Issue 317en
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0739986309336845


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